Skip to main content

Achievements

From 1926 to present day, Nokia has been at the forefront of scientific and technology discoveries that have changed the world.

Discover more

For more than a century, our unrivalled history of innovation has formed the foundation and shaped the future of technology across the spectrum of telecommunications. From the transistor to the laser and solar cells to satellite communications our inventions have created positive industry disruption. Recognized as leading the technology evolutions that matter, we are committed to delivering networks at the edge of science across mobile, infrastructure, cloud and enabling technologies. We are also committed to nurturing diversity that makes Nokia a more vibrant and exciting place to work.

World’s Most Ethical Companies by the Ethisphere Institute

For the fifth year in a row, Nokia was named one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies. Ethisphere selected 132 companies representing 51 industries from 21 countries as the 2020 winners of this prestigious award.

#Corporate

Bloomberg Gender Equality Index (GEI)

For the third consecutive year, Nokia was listed in Bloomberg's Gender Equality Index (GEI). The Bloomberg GEI tracks the performance of public companies committed to supporting gender equality through policy development, representation, and transparency.

#Corporate

Nordic Business Diversity

Nokia scored second in the Large Cap Company category of the Nordic Business Diversity Index. This index compares the 2020 Nasdaq listed companies in Helsinki, Stockholm and Copenhagen based on their diversity in the Executive Board and Board of Directors. Out of 100 total points Nokia scored 71.5.

#Corporate

Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation awarded Nokia the highest possible score of 100% on the 2021 Corporate Equality Index. This designates Nokia as a “Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality. At Nokia, we believe that a diverse workforce drives greater innovation and superior organizational performance and delivers excellent service to our customers.

#Corporate

GTI Awards, Innovative Breakthrough in Mobile Technology

Nokia is recognized for its outstanding contributions in 4G and 5G evolution.Nokia is recognized for its outstanding contributions in 4G and 5G evolution.

#Technology

NATAS Technology & Engineering Emmy® Award

Nokia’s fourth NATAS Technology & Engineering Emmy® Award was awarded for development of the ISO Base Media File Format standardization that enables media streaming.

#Innovation 

Groundbreaking discoveries that impact the world

Through Nokia Bell Labs and our company-wide investment in R&D, we are committed to deliver networks and technology solutions that push the limits of science. A century of pioneering science and telecommunications leadership has enabled us to create foundational technology in the electronics industry, the Internet and networking, optics, mobile and fixed communications industries.

Read more about the science and innovation that shaped the world of communications. 

Mathematics and the digital age

1958 Mammel and Hamming

Mathematics and the digital age

How Claude Shannon and the Bell Labs Mathematics Department founded the digital age. The term ‘computing’ as it is used today does not reflect the process that existed in the first half of the 20th century. In the 1920s-1930s computing meant using mechanical or electrical devices for finding numerical solutions to math problems. At Bell Labs, it also meant designing and building complex telephone switching systems. Automated switching systems were similar to general purpose computers, but without programmability.  At Bell Labs, computing had been a branch of the Mathematics Department since its inception in 1916. Human Computers, as they were called, were people – often women – who used and operated these machines to find mathematical solutions via carefully crafted procedures, what we call programming today.

Read more on mathematics and the digital age.

Satellite comms

Satellite comms

Satellite comms

The first orbital communications satellite. On July 10, 1962, AT&T Bell Telephone Laboratories (now Nokia Bell Labs) and NASA launched Telstar 1, the first communications satellite from Cape Canaveral. Global communications changed forever.

For the first time, live television transmissions and phone signals could be relayed between the US and Europe by means of this simple looking, spherical black and white satellite. Its iconic exterior held within it 170 pounds of some of the most complex electronics known to humankind. It featured 3,600 solar cells for power and a traveling-wave tube for amplifying the radio signals. The key task of Telstar 1 was to receive signals beamed from the US, amplify them 10 billion times and rebroadcast them to live audiences in Europe, and vice versa. TV and telephone communication signals were relayed and boosted to get back down to Earth.

Read more on the first orbiting satellite.

Unix/C/C++

Unix/C/C++

Unix/C/C++

The rise of C++. A flexible programming language enables large-scale data processing systems. Bjarne Stroustrup joined the 1127 Computing Science Research Center of AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1979. Strongly influenced by the object-oriented model of the Simula language (created by Dahl and Nygaard), he began work on developing class extensions to the C language so that developers could write software using a far higher level of abstraction and sophistication while retaining the efficiency of C. Stroustrup's C++ built upon the C programming language, developed by Dennis Ritchie at Bell Labs.

Read more on the rise of C++.

Microscopy

Microscopy

Microscopy

Breaking the diffraction barrier. Super-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy reveals high-resolution 3D images of subcellular activity in real time with minimal damage to cells, allowing biologists to study the activity of molecules, cells and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than ever before. Eric Betzig earned a BS in Physics at California Institute of Technology (1983). He obtained an MS (1985) and PhD (1988) in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University. His thesis focused on the development of the first super-resolution optical microscope, called the near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) [3]. He then joined Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey and worked to improve the NSOM technology he had helped develop at Cornell.

Betzig worked with Jay Trautman, Tim Harris and others to refine the NSOM technology and try out new applications. Together, they developed a scanning microscope featuring a new near-field probe capable of generating images of samples at a resolution of 12 nanometers — better than the diffraction limit. The probe also yielded signals more than 100 times larger than those reported previously. The first to break the diffraction barrier, the powerful microscope was seen as a new means to inspect integrated circuits and examine living cells. In 2014, Eric Betzig won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Read more about why this work was recognized as one of the 100 most significant inventions of 1991.

Anechoic Chamber

Anechoic Chamber

Anechoic Chamber

The world’s oldest wedge-based anechoic chamber enabled critical acoustic research. The Murray Hill anechoic chamber, built in 1947, is the world's oldest wedge-based anechoic chamber. The interior room measures approximately 30 feet high by 28 feet wide by 32 feet deep. The exterior cement and brick walls are about 3 feet thick to reduce outside noise.

The name "anechoic" literally means "without echo." Large fiberglass wedges mounted on the interior surfaces of the chamber absorb echoes or reflections. The wedge-shaped absorbers are 4.5 feet long and 2 feet square at the base. Most current anechoic chambers utilize the alternating wedge pattern that was first used in the Murray Hill chamber. The wedge shape was chosen to "impedance match" the absorber to the surrounding air. The shape can also be considered to be a waveguide whereby all incident acoustic energy is internally reflected into the wedge. The alternating pattern was chosen to give more uniform angular absorption. The chamber absorbs more than 99.995 percent of the incident acoustic energy above 200 Hz. At one time the Murray Hill chamber was cited in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's quietest room.

Read more about how today’s artists-in-residence are using the anechoic chamber to push the boundaries of expression and performance.
 

Neurophysics research

Neurophysics research

Neurophysics research

Powerful technologies for imaging the functions of living cells. Several powerful technologies for imaging the functions of living cells were developed or refined at Bell Labs in the Biological Computation Research area during the 1990s, including two-photon microscopy, functional MRI and near-field optical microscopy—which later led to super-resolution optical microscopy. Although we have known of the existence of neurons for over a century, we do not yet understand the brain completely. Only in the last few years have we begun to develop instruments capable of measuring the microscopic chemical and electrical processes that take place in brain tissue. We are beginning to correlate these processes with high-level functions such as memory, learning and neural diseases.

Read more about the role of physics in neuroscience.