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Machine Remote Control

Enable human operators to precisely control drones and machinery

Machines can go places we can’t, whether it’s a factory with a clean environment, a fire-ravaged forest, or an inaccessible cave. 5G offers an extraordinary opportunity for service providers to enable previously unseen applications for machine remote control, increasing speed, safety, and efficiency, across a range of environments.

Some places are too dangerous for people to go, or too inaccessible. Using remote controlled machines communicating over 5G, it’s possible for human operators to precisely steer drones, cranes and other equipment for industrial and rescue applications. 5G remote control can also enable equipment to be operated from outside cleanrooms, and increase the efficiency of operators by enabling them to control several machines.

Transforming machine operations

Service providers can work with other industry players to enable a wide range of machine remote control applications in 5G:

  • Surveillance drones in rescue missions can use 4K video to help find people.
  • In mining or industrial applications, 5G enables a higher density of connected devices for greater efficiency.
  • For precision operations, 5G supports the low latency required for haptic feedback.

Transforming machine remote control operations through 5G

Guaranteed performance

Using network slicing, operators can guarantee the bandwidth and latency required for effective control.

Massive connectivity

5G supports a much higher density of connected devices, so more machines can be controlled on the same campus. 

Edge computing

Nokia’s multi-access edge computing (MEC) platform processes high-quality video and data at the edge of the network for optimised performance.

We’ve done this before

Let Nokia show you how it’s done. Browse our stories below.

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Network slicing in Hamburg

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